• Image of "San Diego 1994" [Antioch Arrow] MEN'S Shirt (Black)
  • Image of "San Diego 1994" [Antioch Arrow] MEN'S Shirt (Black)
  • Image of "San Diego 1994" [Antioch Arrow] MEN'S Shirt (Black)

100% SUPER-SOFT COTTON

Premium screen-print: thin, durable and “breathable”

[Screen printing by One Off Apparel]

FIT: These are “fashion” fit, so if you are in-between sizes, go up a size instead of down.

A percentage of profits from sales of this shirt will be donated as a gift to Antioch Arrow guitarist Jeff Winterberg, who is currently based in Brooklyn, NY and is battling medulloblastoma, a rare form of brain cancer.

For more information on Jeff and his fight, visit:

www.facebook.com/PictureJeffCancerFree

Q&A WITH PHOTOGRAPHER CAMERON CAMPBELL:

Good Road Goods: So, give us some memories you have about taking this photo.

Cameron Campbell: Originally I thought it was at a place called Café Mesopotamia, but I don't that's right. I'm not sure if the spot even had a name. It was on E Street. In San Diego in the early and mid-‘90s there weren’t a lot of venues to play in, so there were a bunch of smaller places like that. They never lasted too long, they’d fold and then bands would go somewhere else. It was the first time I had been there. I remember walking in and it was only about 15 feet wide, so it was a pretty tight space.

GRG: The first time I saw this photo was in Anthony Pappalardo’s and Nathan Nedorostek’s "Radio Silence" book and aside from the image itself, I was intrigued by the photo credit: “Photo by Cameron Campbell, using Jeff Winterberg’s camera.” What was the deal with that?

CC: That night my camera wasn’t working, I had this little Pentax ME Super. So Jeff said, “Just use mine.” He was the guitarist in the band so it’s not like he was going to be using it while they were playing.

GRG: I know you don’t consider yourself a professional photographer, but how seriously were you about it back then?

CC: I was treating it pretty seriously back then, actually. Jeff and I took photography classes at Palomar Community College, mostly just to use their darkroom. We’d go to shows and skate and shoot like 7 or 8 rolls a night.

GRG: Jeff went on to do a lot of photography work [for more info, check out his excellent photography book "Rat A Tat Tat Birds"], what did you like about his style?

CC: He had a different style than I did, and eventually I gravitated towards his way of shooting. He was all about saturation. Lots of contrast. I loved that. Crisp images, lots of detail. I always had the impression that Jeff listened to music through his camera lens. He always knew when to get a great shot because he was so in-tune with what the music was saying.

GRG: So how did you get that particular shot of Antioch Arrow? It seems like you were up higher.

CC: At those shows, they were really crowded and you’d get pushed around. Which is fine, unless you were taking pictures. The last thing you wanted is to get pushed from behind when you were shooting. And Antioch Arrow always went crazy when they played, plus they never just stood there and faced forward, they were always in motion. So I knew I didn’t want to be right in front of where they were playing. There was a ledge in the venue that was up higher, I guess during the day it would hold speakers or pieces of art or whatever. There were 3 or 4 other people up there, so I would lean over and extend my arm and just shoot. Two weeks later I developed the film and saw what I had.

GRG: For those who aren’t familiar with Antioch, what would you say about them?

CC: In the early ‘90s there were slower bands like 3 Mile Pilot and Sleep and then higher-energy groups like Nation of Ulysses, Born Against and Antioch Arrow. Antioch was very high-energy. You’d be so pumped up after a show that you’d just go and skate all night, until 2 or 3 AM. 30 or 40 minutes was all you needed from those guys, it was an insane experience and it always amped you up.